John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir (26 August 1875 - 11 February 1940) was a Scottish novelist, historian and Unionist politician who served as Governor General of Canada, the 15th since Canadian Confederation. Robert Erskine Childers (25 June 1870 - 24 November 1922), universally known as Erskine Childers, was the author of the influential novel "The Riddle of the Sands" and an Irish nationalist who smuggled guns to Ireland in his sailing yacht "Asgard." He was executed by the authorities of the nascent Irish Free State during the Irish Civil War. He was the son of British Orientalist scholar Robert Caesar Childers; the cousin of Hugh Childers and Robert Barton; and the father of the fourth President of Ireland, Erskine Hamilton Childers. Herman Cyril McNeile (28 September 1888 - 14 August 1937), commonly known as Cyril McNeile and publishing under the name H. C. McNeile or the pseudonym Sapper, was a British soldier and author. Drawing on his experiences in the trenches during the First World War, he started writing short stories and getting them published in the Daily Mail. As serving officers in the British Army were not permitted to publish under their own names, he was given the pen name "Sapper" by Lord Northcliffe, the owner of the Daily Mail; the nickname was based on that of his corps, the Royal Engineers. Arthur George Frederick Griffiths (9 December 1838- 24 March 1908) was a prison administrator and author who published more than 60 books during his lifetime. He was also a military historian who wrote extensively about the wars of the 19th century, and was for a time military correspondent for The Times newspaper. His later accounts of crime and punishment in England were "sensational and grotesque," designed to appeal to the baser fascinations of his Victorian readers. Their success led him to write mystery crime novels such as "Fast and Loose," published in 1885. William Tufnell Le Queux (2 July 1864 - 13 October 1927) was an Anglo-French journalist and writer."

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